Devops Microservices Breakfast Boost

Breakfast Series Scheduled: Microservices and DevOps Education

Lauren Fournier Company News, Microservices, Testing Leave a Comment

Keyhole Software has released a schedule of upcoming educational events that are open to the public. Keyhole is hosting two free Breakfast Boost events to advise members of enterprise development teams on important and emerging technical topics:

  1. Microservices Application Architectural Approach:
    Thursday, January 28th, 2016
  2. DevOps for the Enterprise:
    Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Both free presentations will be held at the Keyhole Software office in Leawood, Kansas on the scheduled event dates from 8-10 a.m. To get more information and reserve your free tickets, please visit the Keyhole Software Eventbrite page.

Microservices Event Details

Thursday, January 28, 2016 | 8-10 a.m.

If you’re in the enterprise, it is common to wonder how long your current technology stack going to last.

We encourage our clients to assume that change is going to happen, and to proactively put in place a decoupled system architecture that provides a smaller surface area of change for your applications in the future.

What can help this proactivity come to pass is Microservices. This style of architecture breaks up application function into smaller independent units that are accessed and discovered at runtime, whether over HTTP or a IP/Socket protocol using RESTful APIs. These services are made immutable through operating system containers (Docker) that allow these services, with all of their required software, to be packaged up in a nice image, moved to servers, and stopped, started, and discovered by other services.

In this breakfast presentation, we will delve into Microservices architecture, assess the pros and cons, and help the audience to better understand if this architectural approach is a good fit for their application development needs.

Register for your free ticket for this event here:

Presentation Topics

  • An overview of how Microservices is approached from an architectural perspective
  • A comparison of Microservices to traditional Monolithic applications, SOA, and distributed computing
  • When best to consider Microservices (and when to avoid)
  • Suggestions for successful implementation
  • A reference application that will walk through implementations of some common Microservice patterns such as Service Discovery, Circuit Breaker, and Api Gateway

DevOps Event Details

Wednesday, February 17, 2016 | 8-10 a.m.

This event encompasses an open house and technical walk through of our DevOps implementation for a Microservices platform.

This DevOps example for a Microservice implementation includes the role of containerization (Docker), Eureka, continuous deployment, scalability, redundancy, health check monitoring, and introducing random failure. See the pieces and parts of a DevOps environment that supports on-demand deployments.

Register for your free ticket for this event here:

Presentation Topics

  • Attributes of the Microservices platform as they pertain to DevOps
  • Elements of DevOps
  • Continuous platform deployment
  • Building immutable containers
  • Role of Eureka in rolling or partial user deployments
  • Planning and validating failure to ensure stability

Who Will Benefit

Managers, architects, leads and developers who are developing software using Java, .NET or JavaScript technology.


About Keyhole Software

Keyhole Software is a Midwest-based software development and consulting firm. Experts in application development and the integration of enterprise-level solutions, Keyhole was founded on the principle of delivering quality through a talented technical team. Kansas City – St. Louis – Chicago.


Lauren Fournier
Marketing Manager, Keyhole Software

About the Author
Lauren Fournier

Lauren Fournier


LinkedIn says Lauren is the Talent Manager, Marketing Doer, And All-Around Keyhole Go-To. Really that just means she gets to be the communication liaison between Keyhole team and the outside world, the mouthpiece within the organization, and the one who makes stuff work on the operations side.

Share this Post

Leave a Reply