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Ryan Flachman

Hi! My name is Ryan Flachman. I am a C# developer with experience in modern JS frameworks and a penchant for learning new technologies! I started my coding career in React and fell in love with the component-style architecture but was soon swayed away to the type safety and ecosystem of C# and the Microsoft stack. I worked in .NET MVC for a long time but always wanted to get back to the React style of developing web applications. Then Microsoft introduced Blazor, and I was instantly hooked as it combined all my experiences together. I am a firm believer that any language, framework, or codebase has something to teach you that will make you a better developer. Whether you are working in the newest bleeding edge framework or you are in a 20-year-old Winforms/VB.NET app, there is always a fun problem to solve!

Blazor Server in .NET 6 - Part 5 HttpClient

Blazor Server in .NET 6 – Part Five

Ryan Flachman .NET, Blazor, Blazor Server in .NET 6 Series, C#, Development Technologies, Tutorial Leave a Comment

In the final part of the Blazor Server in .NET 6 blog series, we covered how to use data binding and dropdowns with lists and enums. This included a short introduction to setting up an HttpService, making a get call to the API, and viewing the results as a string. For further clarity, I also included a demonstration on how to add an HttpService that uses the built-in .NET HttpClient class to make calls to the D&D 5e API!

Finally, I presented a way to add a dropdown with the available race options that our character can choose from. That concludes my five-part educational series on Blazor Server in .NET 6. I hope you enjoyed it, and learned a little something you can take with you. Thanks for tuning in!

Blazor Server in .NET 6 - Part Four - Blazor Components

Blazor Server in .NET 6 – Part Four

Ryan Flachman .NET, Blazor, Blazor Server in .NET 6 Series, C#, Development Technologies, Tutorial Leave a Comment

In Part 4 of the Keyhole Blazor Server in .NET 6 series, we covered adding events in our Blazor components. In sum, I demonstrated how to add a service that contains the events that components can listen to with methods to notify when to invoke our events.

After that, we added that service to the BaseComponent. The section is complete with adding the new character to our list of current characters in storage in order to notify all listening components of this event.

I hope you’re enjoying working with Blazor as much as I do so far. See you in part 5, the final part of the blog series, for how to use dropdowns and data binding using both lists and enums!

Blazor Server in .NET 6 - Part 3 - Radzen Blazor

Blazor Server in .NET 6 – Part Three

Ryan Flachman .NET, Blazor, Blazor Server in .NET 6 Series, C#, Development Technologies, Tutorial Leave a Comment

In part 3 of the Keyhole Blazor Server in .NET 6 series, we installed a free component library called Radzen.Blazer, updated the CharacterInfo component to easily display a Create Character modal, and added the RadzenDialog as a way to standardize our dialog with an easy-to-use component. In the next blog, we will be adding events in our blazor components. See you in part 4!

Blazor Server in .NET 6 – Part Two

Ryan Flachman .NET, Blazor, Blazor Server in .NET 6 Series, C#, Development Technologies, Tutorial Leave a Comment

In Part 2 of the Keyhole Blazor Server in .NET 6 series, we learned how to utilize Blazor Protected Browser Storage. We also covered how to build a base component and implement ProtectedStorage on the Characters Page.

Hopefully, you also found that using ProtectedSessionStorage to scope to the current tab allows you to avoid bugs and confusing behavior across multiple tabs. In the next blog, we will cover the installation of Radzen Blazor – a free component library for Blazor. See you in part 3!

Blazor Server in .NET 6 – Part One

Ryan Flachman .NET, Blazor, Blazor Server in .NET 6 Series, C#, Development Technologies Leave a Comment

In Part 1 of the Keyhole Blazor Server in .NET 6 series, we learned how to create a new Blazor server application with both the CLI and Visual Studio methods. We covered the default template files that are provided when creating a new application and talked through some of the functionality and syntax inside the default components.

This gave us a brief primer for creating our own Character Builder application, so we created a Blazor page, navigated to our new page, and created a component to display data on a Character Page. We were able to see how component lifestyles function when attempting to display our characters as well.

Hopefully, Part 1 provided a helpful outline for navigating the CharactersPage component in further installments of the .NET 6 series. See you in Part 2, where we build on this application to utilize Blazor Protected Browser Storage.