About the Author

Rik Scarborough

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Rik Scarborough is a Kansas City-based software developer on the Keyhole Software team. He specializes in Enterprise Application Development using Java, Web Application Development, Spring Batch, Google's Appengine, Google Web Toolkit (GWT), and Groovy. Also, a student of conversational American Sign Language.

Solid: A New Web Standard Allowing People to Control Their Own Data

Rik Scarborough Development Technologies, Programming, Security Leave a Comment

This post contains a recap of my research into the subject and an exploration of Sir Tim’s so-called new Internet – a technology called Solid. We’ll start by exploring what Solid is, and then we’ll talk about its purposes and how to use it. It’s a pretty cool technology!

So, let’s dive in. What exactly has Sir Tim Berners-Lee created?

Documenting with Markdown

Rik Scarborough Development Technologies, Programming Leave a Comment

In today’s environment, we have an embarrassment of riches when it comes to documenting our applications. We have a multitude of word processors, websites with word processors built in, wikis, and notes applications galore.

So you may be wondering, is there even any point in talking about ways to document your application? I think there is. In this blog, I’ll share my documentation tool and how and why you can use it in your own projects. It’s called Markdown.

Transferring Spring Batch Apps to AWS Cloud

Rik Scarborough AWS, Cloud, Development Technologies, Spring, Spring Batch, Tutorial 2 Comments

The last few years have seen a lot of movement to bring applications that don’t require manual intervention from the mainframe to Unix, Linux, Windows servers, or even to the desktop. This concept is commonly known as batch programming, and Spring Batch has been the tool many of us are using to accomplish this. Another trend that is gaining steam is to move from an internally-hosted server to a cloud-hosted system.

In this post, we discuss multiple ways for transferring Spring Batch applications up to the AWS Cloud, including EC2, Docker, Lambda, and others. I concentrate on AWS in this post, but, from my experience in Google Cloud, the same ideas will apply…

Java-Based UI Frameworks

Rik Scarborough Java, Programming 1 Comment

In today’s development environment, there is an abundance of frameworks that we can choose from for front-end or user interface (UI) work.

I was recently talking with a friend about UI development. He has also been a programmer since programming was considered an arcane art (when those of us that did it were considered like Gandalf the Grey facing the Balrog). Or maybe we just saw ourselves that way. Regardless, both of us have been Java programmers for a great deal of that time.

We both lamented the fact that it was a context switch to go from coding most of our projects in Java, then needing to switch to JavaScript for the front end.

Based on conversations I’ve seen online, several readers are warming up their keyboards to chide me for complaining about having to code in JavaScript. Keep your keys cool, both of us and our co-workers are experienced in, and happy to write in, JavaScript and any of its frameworks for our clients. But using JavaScript isn’t always the best approach.

 In this post, we introduce two frameworks that allow you to code your user interface in Java: GWT & Vaadin…

Hello Micronaut

Rik Scarborough Java, Microservices, Testing Leave a Comment

From some of my previous posts, you can get the idea that I promote the idea of developing maintainable code rapidly. So I was pretty excited when I learned that the same group that was responsible for Grails was working on a similar project for Web Services. Hello, Micronaut.

In this post, I provide an introduction to the Micronaut framework and its features to provide a foundation for you to try it out yourself.