Getting to Know Custom CSS Properties

Lawrence Chabela CSS & HTML, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

CSS custom properties are very powerful way for you to spice up your style sheets. They are a way to separate JavaScript behavior and styling, as shown in the ability to set information in the JavaScript for the CSS to use for its styling.

Even if you’re using a preprocessor for your CSS, there is still a place for CSS custom properties to be directly embedded in your CSS.

In this blog: we introduce custom CSS properties, show why you want to use them, how to define them, and how to change them with and without JavaScript.



See Keyhole at Dev Up 2017

Lauren Fournier Community, Company News Leave a Comment

We are pleased to announce that Keyhole Software is a Platinum Sponsor of the 2017 Dev Up Conference.

Formerly known as the St. Louis Days of .NET and rebranded as Dev Up during the 2015 conference, the 10th annual edition will bring together regional and national IT experts to share their knowledge for technology.

Two speakers from the Keyhole Software team will present topics at this year’s event: Chase Aucoin & Billy Korando…. 



An Example Progressive Web App on Android

RJ Dela-Cruz AngularJS, JavaScript, Mobile, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

In my experience, the best way to learn a new technology is to create something tangible with it. I recently sought out to learn Angular and Angular Material. So, I developed an experimental Angular app that uses omdbapi to query Movie Posters. It’s aptly named Movie Poster Finder.

Developing the Movie Poster Finder application, I ran into a thing called PWA, which is also known as Progressive Web Applications. I thought it was really neat that both Android and mobile Chrome treat them as native applications.

In this post, I will show an example Progressive Web Application in action, explaining what I encountered when turning an experimental Angular web application into a PWA.



Web Development Business

The Executable Code Review

Tim Broyles Programming, Testing Leave a Comment

Testing has a bad rap. The thought of writing unit tests to exercise code with the goal of 100% code coverage can be overwhelming for many projects. The number of man-hours to set up tests, create mocks when needed, test boundary conditions, contrive odd ball test cases can take some steam out of the project. If this is the definition of test, then yes, writing these types of tests can be tedious and feel meaningless.

I am a proponent of writing tests with a narrow focus. The tests I describe here show the completion of a story or the resolution of a bug. With this narrowness in mind, the task is much less daunting. My goal now is not about code coverage, but more about quality code. With this test, I want to be able to demonstrate to myself (and to whoever is reviewing my changes), that I have successfully resolved my task.

In this blog I will talk about my suggestions for writing meaningful tests in the context of a code review.



React v16.0 Release Overview and Migration

Luke Curran JavaScript, React, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

React v16.0 was released by Facebook on Tuesday, September 26th. This version introduces performance boosts and other very helpful features.

React 16 brings some significant internal changes features to the table. In my opinion, one of the most interesting thing about this release is that React has been rewritten. Luckily, in terms of upgrading, if your app runs in 15.6 without any warnings, it should work in 16 (with minor exceptions).

In this blog I highlight some of the new features introduced in React v16.0, in addition to demonstrating how to update your current React applications to v16.0 using a Keyhole open source application for reference…