Create your own web bots in .NET with CEFSharp!

Matt Cunningham .NET, JavaScript, Programming, Tutorial Leave a Comment

Have you ever wanted to create an automated way to load, manipulate, and then act upon a web page?

Using CEFSharp (and some strategic JavaScript), you can create headless (no GUI) interfaces of Chrome’s parent browser, Chromium, and then instruct them to do pretty much anything a web browser can do.

This is a tutorial about using CEFSharp to accomplish some basic web functions with simple examples. We’ll create three automated bots that can simulate user web interaction and programmatically react to browser events using CEF and the CEFSharp library. You can follow along by copying the code provided or by downloading…

Running Your Life With Emacs

Garrett Hopper Problem Solving, Programming, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

I program a lot, but I also do a lot of other things using a computer.

The problem is, I often want to use the same efficient key bindings I use while programming when I’m doing other tasks. I want to be writing an email or documentation and edit a code snippet in the same way I normally edit code. I want to manage Git repositories right from my editor without having to touch the mouse. I want to browse the web in my editor, so I can easily copy code examples and run them. I want to track my to-do lists and the amount of time spent on each task.

Imagine if there was a tool that could do all that and a ton more in an efficiently consistent way. That tool is Emacs…

Why Event Storming?

John Hoestje Dev Methodologies, Opinion, Problem Solving Leave a Comment

My last Event Storming blog was like a stew I made by throwing in everything from the fridge and pantry. Maybe the stew was okay, but most of the individual ingredients got lost in the mix.

This time, I’m including the points to back my position as to why you should start using Event Storming now. Although, in my opinion, choosing Event Storming doesn’t take a lot of convincing to make it sound more appealing than other techniques.

So why should Event Storming be used in place of other more established domain modeling processes?

While it isn’t beneficial to always try out the latest and greatest whiz-bang gadgets, not keeping tabs on emerging and promising trends can prevent your team from becoming more efficient…

The Jury is Still Out: Blockchain in Healthcare

Zach Gardner Blockchain, Hyperledger, Opinion Leave a Comment

Blockchain has gotten the software world buzzing about its potential applications in different business areas. With the US spending 17.9% of its GDP on healthcare in 2017 per CMS, many companies are considering how to enter into a market that has such potential for growth as well as the potential to positively affect patient’s lives.

Keyhole Software stays ahead of the curve by investigating new trends in software so that when clients come to us asking for advice we can provide an informed opinion. We do not want our clients to be guinea pigs, and we help provide guidance so that the solution they choose is the best one regardless of the trends of the day.

Blockchain is something we feel could be a good fit for the right use case, which we’ve elaborated on in our Blockchain Case Study. It is, at the end of the day, just a tool, and should only be used when it is beneficial to do so. Healthcare is an incredibly complex industry, so it is important to understand what Blockchain is, what it is not, and what needs to be considered before using the technology.

The purpose of this blog post is to think through how Blockchain can be applied to healthcare software applications. This blog post does not dive into the technical implementation of Blockchain, only its application in healthcare. A technical deep dive into Blockchain can be found in our Blockchain White Paper.

Java Development Using Visual Studio Code

Todd Horn Design, Dev Methodologies, Java, Problem Solving, Programming Leave a Comment

Over the last few years, I have worked on several .NET and JavaScript projects. My go-to IDE for Angular, Node, and (in starting to learn) React has been Visual Studio Code, along with Visual Studio Enterprise for C#.

Recently, I started on a new team and project that was in Java. Our initial thought was to switch back over to Spring Tool Suite or IntelliJ. But, there are some really good extensions now for Java in VS Code that made that transition unnecessary. So we decided to take a look at what Visual Studio code could do for us – we were very pleasantly surprised!

In this post, I provide links and information to get you started down the right path for Java in Visual Studio Code.