Documentation: Enough Already! Not.

Mike McCoy Consulting, Other, Problem Solving, Soft Skills Leave a Comment

Documentation. I know we all hate having to create it. I don’t like writing it and feel like I always leave something out. However, our assumptions of what other developers should think we are trying to accomplish by our masterpieces of software are usually filled with potholes (sometimes big ones). The truth of the matter is that no matter how stellar your code or software is – if you’re the only one who understands how it works, it doesn’t do any good.

These are not paintings or sculptures that would live the rest of their days in a museum, untouched by human hands and just collecting dust as they run. In reality, documentation will be added to and changed as the information they describe evolves.

In this blog, we discuss two suggested strategies for the creation of useful and concise software documentation.

Picking A Graph Database: ArangoDB, Neo4j, or OrientDB

John Hoestje Databases, Opinion, Problem Solving, Programming Leave a Comment

TL;DR

– Spoiler alert! Graph databases are a great option for storing complex and highly connected data.
– In this post, I compare the benefits and risks of graph databases ArangoDB, Neo4j, and OrientDB for a client project.
– Due to the combination of performance and cost, I chose ArangoDB for my client’s needs.

JavaScript Optional Chaining – An Introduction

Lawrence Chabela CSS & HTML, JavaScript, Problem Solving, Technology Snapshot 1 Comment

There is a new exciting feature coming to JavaScript in the not-so-far future. That feature is Optional Chaining. At this moment, Optional Chaining is in Stage 3 of the TC39 process, so it’s in late stages of the process and will be here soonish.

In general terms, Optional Chaining is an approach to simplify JavaScript expressions for accessing deeply nested values, array items, and methods when there is a possibility that a reference may be missing.

In this blog, we give an introduction to Optional Chaining in JavaScript. We discuss what problems Optional Chaining solves, the various ways you can use it, and relatable code examples.

Progressive Web App Tips and Tricks

John Boardman CSS & HTML, HTML5, Problem Solving Leave a Comment

PWA (Progressive Web App) is a powerful solution to multiple problems. Prior to PWA, there were some browser-specific implementations to some of the problems solved by PWA, but PWA is much more elegant while solving more problems at the same time.

In this post, we’ll cover the problems PWA was created to solve, some of the solutions PWA replaced, tools that make PWA development faster and more flexible, and tips to get the most out of PWA development.

Using C#, XAML + Uno Platform to Build One Codebase, Cross-Platform Apps

Rukesh Shrestha C#, Mobile, Problem Solving, Technology Snapshot 1 Comment

For more than a decade, we have been developing applications with C# and XAML. Throughout that time, the pair has really only been known for Desktop (WPF) and UWP applications.

Later came Xamarin, which utilizes C# as a unified language to share between all platforms. Then Xamarin.Forms was introduced, which was different in that it utilized XAML to develop the user interface with a single codebase for cross-platform (iOS, Android, UWP).

This progression has excited all the WPF developers out there. The only remaining platform left was web development. At one time, Silverlight was the option, but it was deprecated because of heavy loading and security concerns of browser plug-in solutions.

Then came the WebAssembly [also known as Web Assembly Modules (WASM)] that web browsers can directly execute without having to parse a source file.

In this post, we will discuss how to create a rich user browser interface using the cross-platform Uno Platform and WebAssembly technology. The example application will walk through building Models, ViewModel and View under a shared project that is common to all different platform-specific projects.