Integrating Azure Functions with Cosmos DB SQL API in .NET Core 2.2

Zach Gardner .NET Core, Azure, Technology Snapshot, Tutorial Leave a Comment

I am working on a project that leverages both Azure Functions as well as Cosmos DB. In trying to get both of these components wired together, I found that there are very few examples that work with the most recent versions of these components. I also saw examples that could work at a small scale, but don’t show industry-standard best practices, and would lead to performance issues if deployed in an environment with any meaningful traffic.

To that end, I put together this blog post showing how to set up an Azure Functions project in .NET Core 2.2 to integrate with Cosmos DB’s SQL API using its native tooling.

Building a Java Cloud Native Spring Microservice Application on Azure, Part 1

Zach Gardner Azure, Cloud, Java, Microservices, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

The big three cloud providers (AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud, in that order) have their various strengths and areas of expertise. Most large organizations though typically pick one cloud provider for their cloud computing needs. This works well if you’re a Java shop that’s on AWS, or a Microsoft shop on Azure. But what if you’re on a large Java project in an organization that wants to use Azure? You’re in luck.

Microsoft Azure has come a long way, and is very supportive of non-Microsoft technologies. The proof though is in the pudding. Which is where this blog post comes in. I take Josh Long’s Bootiful Microservice Services, a great starting point to get a cloud native Spring microservice application up and running, and show how it can be run on Azure.

This first blog post will be all about setting up our basic microservices by walking through the various parts of Josh’s example application, with some best practices and patterns that I’ve found to be effective. Rather than a simplistic ToDo application, we’ll be basing our application off of my favorite bagel shop in New York, Original Bagel Boss in Hicksville, to manage its orders, inventory, etc. If we can run a bagel shop on a Spring application running on Azure, and keep customers happy and full of carbohydrates, then it proves out for applications of a similar size and complexity.

We’ll be staying mostly inside the familiar Java confines, then slowly start working our way out to getting our application deployed to Azure. Then we’ll start introducing additional complexity like Spring Batch jobs, a React front end, etc. A setup this complex will show that Azure is ready for prime time when it comes to running applications in production, even if they are built on non-Microsoft technologies…

Getting Started with Xamarin.Forms and Azure Mobile App Service

Jeff Hopper .NET, Azure, Mobile, Technology Snapshot, Tutorial, Xamarin 2 Comments

Earlier this month my friend Ryan introduced us to Getting Started with Xamarin Forms and Prism. In that post, Ryan started a mobile application to display blog posts which he called SimpleBlog.

In this article, I would like to continue that demonstration by adding a back-end server to persist and share these blogs. This will be accomplished using Azure’s Mobile App Service which falls within its free tier services.

Yes, you did read that right: you can spin up an Azure account and have access to try out many of Azure’s features. For instance, the example I am going to walk you through today can be hosted indefinitely without costing you anything, and to that, you could add nine more web, mobile, or API services. See https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/free/ for more information.

There is no way I am going to be able to cover all the possibilities available in an Azure Mobile App service, much less what Azure has to offer. My intent in this post is to help “whet your appetite” on the possibilities by giving a quick overview of just two great frameworks that play great together: the Microsoft.Azure.Mobile.Client mobile framework tied to an Azure Mobile Apps Service….

Keyhole Sponsoring Azure Dev Days Kansas City 2018

Keyhole Software .NET, Azure, Community, Company News, Educational Event Leave a Comment

We are excited to announce Keyhole’s partnership with Microsoft to sponsor Azure Dev Days, a one-day workshop in Kansas City on Wednesday, April 25, 2018. This is a free community event to provide education on application modernization, microservices, and Microsoft Azure topics.

In addition to providing technical educators for this workshop, Keyhole Software will sponsor food and beverages. The topics Keyhole will champion include Microservices and Containers, as well as App Services.

Each technical session will be followed by a hands-on Azure lab and a whiteboard design exercise. This workshop will help attendees gain a thorough understanding of the components of Azure and how you can take advantage of them as a developer.

This is a traveling community event, with other events available to attend in St. Louis and Oklahoma City. The event will be held at the Microsoft offices in Overland Park…

Taking on the Azure Developer Certification (70-532) Exam

Vince Pendergrass .NET, Azure, Opinion, Service Fabric 6 Comments

Many of the companies that we work with use various cloud providers (such as Google, Amazon and Microsoft) for IT Service Delivery. This has created a great need for those who assist these companies to possess the technical skills required for proper and effective implementation of such services.

An excellent way to make yourself stand apart from the crowd in this space (and your company for that matter), is to obtain a developer/architect certification, such as the Microsoft Azure Developer Certification. Plus, if your company is focusing on becoming a Microsoft partner, it may be necessary to have a few developers on your team spend some time working to become certified. Fortunately, my awesome company Keyhole Software presented me with this opportunity.

In this blog, I share what I did to prepare for the Azure developer certification, specifically the 70-532 Developing Microsoft Azure Solutions Certification exam. I’ll include a couple of prep tools that helped me significantly, as well as a few unexpected “gotchas” I encountered when taking the exam…