[Video] Azure Options For Enterprise: Pros, Cons & Use Cases

Keyhole Software .NET, Azure, Cloud, Keyhole, Service Fabric, Technology Snapshot, Tutorial, Video Leave a Comment

The Azure cloud platform is vast and it can be difficult to determine the best option given unique requirements. This video discusses six options within the wide world of Microsoft Azure including Virtual Machines (IaaS), App Services (PaaS), Function Apps (FaaS), AKS (KaaS), Logic Apps (?aaS), and Service Fabric (PaaS).

For each option, Keyhole Software Consultant Zach Gardner introduces the pros, cons, optimal use cases, and tips for success with each Azure approach based on his experience.

This 40-minute video was recorded in November 2019 at a Keyhole Software internal employee Lunch & Learn event featuring Keyhole Consultant Zach Gardner…

How to Create a Dystopian Future at Home with Python, OpenCV, and Microsoft Azure

Derek Andre Azure, Cloud, Python, Technology Snapshot, Tutorial Leave a Comment

Facial recognition is both amazing and horrifying. Some amazing things it can do is the ability to find missing children or seniors, using your face to unlock your phone, and being able to board an airplane faster.

In this blog post, I want to highlight some powerful tools and platforms that allow you to create distributed facial recognition systems with OpenCV and Azure’s Cognitive Services. By the end of this post, you will have a working face detector using OpenCV that can communicate with Azure’s Cognitive Services.

I used Python 3.7.4 and pip 19.2.3 for this project. You can view the code from this blog at https://github.com/dcandre/Dystopian-Future-At-Home.

Integrating Azure Functions with Cosmos DB SQL API in .NET Core 2.2

Zach Gardner .NET Core, Azure, Technology Snapshot, Tutorial Leave a Comment

I am working on a project that leverages both Azure Functions as well as Cosmos DB. In trying to get both of these components wired together, I found that there are very few examples that work with the most recent versions of these components. I also saw examples that could work at a small scale, but don’t show industry-standard best practices, and would lead to performance issues if deployed in an environment with any meaningful traffic.

To that end, I put together this blog post showing how to set up an Azure Functions project in .NET Core 2.2 to integrate with Cosmos DB’s SQL API using its native tooling.

Building a Java Cloud Native Spring Microservice Application on Azure, Part 1

Zach Gardner Azure, Cloud, Java, Microservices, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

The big three cloud providers (AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud, in that order) have their various strengths and areas of expertise. Most large organizations though typically pick one cloud provider for their cloud computing needs. This works well if you’re a Java shop that’s on AWS, or a Microsoft shop on Azure. But what if you’re on a large Java project in an organization that wants to use Azure? You’re in luck.

Microsoft Azure has come a long way, and is very supportive of non-Microsoft technologies. The proof though is in the pudding. Which is where this blog post comes in. I take Josh Long’s Bootiful Microservice Services, a great starting point to get a cloud native Spring microservice application up and running, and show how it can be run on Azure.

This first blog post will be all about setting up our basic microservices by walking through the various parts of Josh’s example application, with some best practices and patterns that I’ve found to be effective. Rather than a simplistic ToDo application, we’ll be basing our application off of my favorite bagel shop in New York, Original Bagel Boss in Hicksville, to manage its orders, inventory, etc. If we can run a bagel shop on a Spring application running on Azure, and keep customers happy and full of carbohydrates, then it proves out for applications of a similar size and complexity.

We’ll be staying mostly inside the familiar Java confines, then slowly start working our way out to getting our application deployed to Azure. Then we’ll start introducing additional complexity like Spring Batch jobs, a React front end, etc. A setup this complex will show that Azure is ready for prime time when it comes to running applications in production, even if they are built on non-Microsoft technologies…

Getting Started with Xamarin.Forms and Azure Mobile App Service

Jeff Hopper .NET, Azure, Mobile, Technology Snapshot, Tutorial, Xamarin 2 Comments

Earlier this month my friend Ryan introduced us to Getting Started with Xamarin Forms and Prism. In that post, Ryan started a mobile application to display blog posts which he called SimpleBlog.

In this article, I would like to continue that demonstration by adding a back-end server to persist and share these blogs. This will be accomplished using Azure’s Mobile App Service which falls within its free tier services.

Yes, you did read that right: you can spin up an Azure account and have access to try out many of Azure’s features. For instance, the example I am going to walk you through today can be hosted indefinitely without costing you anything, and to that, you could add nine more web, mobile, or API services. See https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/free/ for more information.

There is no way I am going to be able to cover all the possibilities available in an Azure Mobile App service, much less what Azure has to offer. My intent in this post is to help “whet your appetite” on the possibilities by giving a quick overview of just two great frameworks that play great together: the Microsoft.Azure.Mobile.Client mobile framework tied to an Azure Mobile Apps Service….