Native MongoDB to Sequelize with PostgreSQL

Native MongoDB to Sequelize with PostgreSQL

John Boardman Databases, Heroku, MongoDB, PostrgreSQL Leave a Comment

Every long-term project will outlive at least some of the technologies it was originally built with. For example, a project I have been involved with recently ran into this situation. The app is hosted on Heroku, and over the years, the available MongoDB add-ons have changed and dwindled until now, there is only one.

Several migrations between MongoDB add-ons have already happened because of shutdowns. So, it was decided that rather than migrating to the last one still in existence, the project would switch to using PostgreSQL, which is supported directly by the Heroku team.

Large Datasets with Spring Batch

Utilizing Spring Batch for Large Dataset Summarization

Clayton Neff Databases, Java, Spring, Spring Batch Leave a Comment

Attention: The following article was published over 2 years ago, and the information provided may be aged or outdated. Please keep that in mind as you read the post.I was recently tasked with summarizing the data of a several-million-row table, and the task proved to be a bit grueling at first. Eventually, I found a way to summarize the large …

Go To SQL

Gabe Schmidt Databases, Go, Programming, Tutorial Leave a Comment

In between projects here at Keyhole, I’ve been tasked with applying a relational database access and mapping framework in the Go language.

In this post, I go step by step to create a Postgres relational database, then perform CRUD operations against it in the Go language.

I won’t get into the specifics of configuring Go in this blog, but you can check it out yourself here – https://golang.org/. Additionally, Keyhole’s very own David Pitt wrote an excellent primer on the subject here – https://keyholesoftware.com/2019/09/26/go-on-the-fly/.

AWS Amplify GraphQL Queries with TypeScript and Hooks

Mat Warger AWS, Cloud, GraphQL, JavaScript, React, Tutorial, TypeScript Leave a Comment

I’m a big fan of Amplify. I’m also a big fan of TypeScript. Amplify is not built with TypeScript, and to use it effectively, sometimes you need to give it a little help, especially when it comes to GraphQL. With the advent of hooks, we can create some nice utilities for ourselves that let us leverage the power of TypeScript with our GraphQL queries. Let’s see what that looks like.

I’ll be assuming familiarity with React and TypeScript, i…

Originally posted by Mat Warger on mw.codes April 19, 2019.