Machine Learning: The Time is Now!

David Pitt Machine Learning, React, Tutorial Leave a Comment

Machine Learning enables a system to automatically learn and progress from experience without being explicitly programmed. It’s a subset of the artificial intelligence (AI) technology space being applied and used throughout your everyday life. Think Siri, Alexa, toll booth scanners, text transcription of voicemails – these types of tools are used by just about everyone.

Image recognition and computer vision are also widely being used in production; recently just heard that Los Angeles, CA has made it illegal for law enforcement to use face recognition technology in its numerous public video cameras. The current state of the art allows real-time identification.

Interestingly, the algorithms and know-how for Machine Learning have been around for a long time. Artificial Intelligence was coined and researched as far back as the late 1950s, the advent of the digital computer, and expert systems and neural networks, that theoretically mimics how our brain learns.

The increase in Machine Learning production-ready applications started around 2012, with increased processing, bandwidth, and internet throughput power. This is important as deep learning algorithms like Neural Networks require lots of data and FPUs/GPUs to train.

In this blog, we introduce a conceptual overview of Neural Networks with a simple Neural Net code example implementation using Go. We will interact with it by building a ReactJS interface and train the Neural Network to recognize hand-drawn images of the numbers 0-9. Let’s dive in….

AWS Amplify GraphQL Queries with TypeScript and Hooks

Mat Warger AWS, JavaScript, React, Technology Snapshot, Tutorial, TypeScript Leave a Comment

I’m a big fan of Amplify. I’m also a big fan of TypeScript. Amplify is not built with TypeScript, and to use it effectively, sometimes you need to give it a little help, especially when it comes to GraphQL. With the advent of hooks, we can create some nice utilities for ourselves that let us leverage the power of TypeScript with our GraphQL queries. Let’s see what that looks like.

I’ll be assuming familiarity with React and TypeScript, i…

Originally posted by Mat Warger on mw.codes April 19, 2019.

Part 6: Node + Express for a ​S​imple ​S​ecurity ​M​odel

Chris Berry JavaScript, Node, Single-Page Application, Tutorial, Vue Leave a Comment

Part of the Solid Foundations Learning Series

This is an in-depth learning series focused on a specific application: a JavaScript-based suite of single-page applications optimized for use in a microservice environment. We focus on telling the story of “why” and “how” it was built.

Throughout this series, we have touched on adding navigation, content and single-page applications, but we haven’t touched on the security of the application yet.

In this article, we’re going to add a simple security model to the application which will accept a login, validate a user, redirect to a secure page, enable a logout, and catch any errors which occur during the process. Let’s get started.

AWS Lambda With NestJS

Greg Emerick AWS, JavaScript, Node, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

In my previous blog post, I showed running a Spring Boot Java application in AWS Lambda. I discussed the pros and cons of using Java and Spring with Lambda. In this blog post, I’ll cover another Lambda option with NestJS. NestJS provides a framework that is not too different from a typical Spring application. It also addresses some of the negatives of using Java and Spring in a Lambda function.

To recap, AWS Lambda provides low cost compute with zero maintenance. Lambda runs your code on demand, without provisioned and managed servers. Lambda automatically runs and scales your code. You are charged for every 100ms your code executes and the number of times your code is triggered. Lambda has clear cost and maintenance benefits over typical on-premise or EC2 deployments. What does it take to run a Nest application as a Lambda? Does NestJS provide benefits over a Java Spring application?

Part 5: Div​ing into the Vue.js SPA

Chris Berry JavaScript, Node, Single-Page Application, Tutorial, Vue Leave a Comment

Part 5 of the Solid Foundations Learning Series
This is an in-depth learning series focused on a specific application: a JavaScript-based suite of single-page applications optimized for use in a microservice environment. We focus on telling the story of “why” and “how” it was built.

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In Part 4 of this series, we learned the why and how of adding single-page applications to our server-rendered application. In this blog, we take a small step to the side and talk about our Vue.js app that is added to the reference application. We will specifically focus on how the Vue.js components are added and how the routing is completed within the SPA.