One Router to Rule Them All: React Router

Mat Warger JavaScript, React, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

Previously, we looked at a very basic example of how one can benefit greatly by using community projects such as Formik to avoid the tedium of certain solutions while embracing convention to create composable and scalable applications. We will be build on that foundation to explore the objectively great library that is React Router.

React Router has been at the forefront of routing in the React ecosystem for as long as I can remember. If you’re new to React, this is the way to go when you move state and start needing more options such as parameterized routing, nesting, and conditional rendering. If you have experience with React, this brings a powerful pattern to bear in that everything is a component. It takes the composablity of React and uses that to its benefit, handling any and all use-cases with relative ease.

In this blog, we’ll introduce the basics of the React Router through hands-on examples using its features.



Angular Developer: JavaScript to TypeScript

Chris Shatrov AngularJS, JavaScript, React, TypeScript Leave a Comment

New JavaScript frameworks and libraries are created every day. This generates a dilemma: which solution should we use when starting a project?

My web development experience over the last few years has mainly included the AngularJS and Backbone.js frameworks. Angular, jQuery and traditional JavaScript have been in my comfort zone. When I ended up being face-to-face with TypeScript, it felt new, scary, and pretty confusing. I want to make that transition easier for you!

The goal of this post is to provide you an understanding of TypeScript, particularly when you come from an Angular web development background. To do so, we will first give an introduction to TypeScript. We will then discuss the differences between the different versions of Angular & Angular vs. React, with an eye for what you need to know to understand the JavaScript tooling landscape TypeScript plays in. And, lastly, we’ll go through a tangible TypeScript example for a look into syntax & structure.



The Joy of Forms with React and Formik

Mat Warger JavaScript, React, Technology Snapshot, Tutorial Leave a Comment

React is a JavaScript library for building user interfaces. That’s it. It’s a way to use JavaScript to define UI elements based on user-defined properties and internal state.

It has a clean, functional style. You can create simple components that compose very well into larger components, which you can then use to compose pages and entire applications. This simple composability is one of the main reasons I enjoy working with it.

But, it is not an application framework. It doesn’t pretend to be. This can be useful when all you want is some quick UI. But, as the application grows, you will need to depend on outside libraries for things like state-management, routing, and forms.

In this article, learn how to handle form input with React, from basic form input using simple state through advanced form components using Formik….



React v16.0 Release Overview and Migration

Luke Curran JavaScript, React, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

React v16.0 was released by Facebook on Tuesday, September 26th. This version introduces performance boosts and other very helpful features.

React 16 brings some significant internal changes features to the table. In my opinion, one of the most interesting thing about this release is that React has been rewritten. Luckily, in terms of upgrading, if your app runs in 15.6 without any warnings, it should work in 16 (with minor exceptions).

In this blog I highlight some of the new features introduced in React v16.0, in addition to demonstrating how to update your current React applications to v16.0 using a Keyhole open source application for reference…



A Conversation About Conversations

David Pitt Conversational Apps, JavaScript, Keyhole Creations, Mobile, Node.js, React, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

We created a platform that supports developing a “conversational” type application through SMS. The user experience between a user and an SMS application can be thought of as a conversation. A user texts a question or topic, and a reply is returned, then another question and reply is performed until a desired result is accomplished.

Now, this is not a universal user experience, but for many use cases it can provide an easy to deliver users functionality quickly and conveniently. There is no need to install or download apps, or pop open a browser and type in a URL; just have a conversation through your texting app.

In this blog: Why conversational applications are handy, examples of conversational applications we have created, and a walkthrough of the application architecture used to develop those SMS applications. Includes how to make texting a richer experience, state, and session handling insights.