Redux InitialState with TypeScript

Redux with TypeScript: Focus on InitialState

John Boardman JavaScript, TypeScript 2 Comments

For this blog, I’m going to continue using the example project I’ve used for the last several blogs, Whirlpool. You can find my last post on the Keyhole Dev Blog – Updating Microservices with Netty, Kafka, and React: Whirlpool revisited. Feel free to go back and read about microservices, Netty, Kafka, and React, or just start here with me and continue on the journey. Either way, I’m glad you’re here.

The focus of this blog will be creating Redux’s InitialState using TypeScript. It tends to be tricky to get it to stop complaining about types, so this should be helpful. Personally, I’ve encountered this issue several times across multiple projects, so I think it is worth talking about.

How TypeScript Can Take Your React Development to the Next Level

Justin Hurt JavaScript, React, TypeScript Leave a Comment

No matter how much you love JavaScript, as with all languages, there are certain aspects of it that are bothersome and frustrating. The lack of strict typing of variables/objects and the mysterious reference errors that don’t present themselves until run-time are among the most common complaints about JavaScript. Luckily, TypeScript offers a solution, especially for React-based applications.

TypeScript alleviates these headaches for vanilla Javascript. When integrated with a JavaScript framework like React, web application development becomes much more consistent with a standard object-orientated language.

In this blog post, I will be giving you a high-level breakdown of what TypeScript is and how to use it with either a new or existing React application.

State Machines Using XSTATE

An Introduction to State Machines Using xstate

Mat Warger Development Technologies, JavaScript, React, TypeScript 1 Comment

State machines are an old concept. They are a proven solution that provides a solid architectural foundation for application processes. In this article, I hope to provide an introduction to what they are and how they can be useful for a modern web or mobile application engineer. We’ll be focusing on one library in particular – xstate – and how it can allow anyone to easily leverage state machines for managing global or component state.

AWS Amplify GraphQL Queries with TypeScript and Hooks

Mat Warger AWS, Cloud, GraphQL, JavaScript, React, Tutorial, TypeScript Leave a Comment

I’m a big fan of Amplify. I’m also a big fan of TypeScript. Amplify is not built with TypeScript, and to use it effectively, sometimes you need to give it a little help, especially when it comes to GraphQL. With the advent of hooks, we can create some nice utilities for ourselves that let us leverage the power of TypeScript with our GraphQL queries. Let’s see what that looks like.

I’ll be assuming familiarity with React and TypeScript, i…

Originally posted by Mat Warger on mw.codes April 19, 2019.

Angular Developer: JavaScript to TypeScript

Chris Shatrov Angular, JavaScript, React, TypeScript 1 Comment

New JavaScript frameworks and libraries are created every day. This generates a dilemma: which solution should we use when starting a project?

My web development experience over the last few years has mainly included the AngularJS and Backbone.js frameworks. Angular, jQuery and traditional JavaScript have been in my comfort zone. When I ended up being face-to-face with TypeScript, it felt new, scary, and pretty confusing. I want to make that transition easier for you!

The goal of this post is to provide you an understanding of TypeScript, particularly when you come from an Angular web development background. To do so, we will first give an introduction to TypeScript. We will then discuss the differences between the different versions of Angular & Angular vs. React, with an eye for what you need to know to understand the JavaScript tooling landscape TypeScript plays in. And, lastly, we’ll go through a tangible TypeScript example for a look into syntax & structure.