An Example Progressive Web App on Android

RJ Dela-Cruz AngularJS, JavaScript, Mobile, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

In my experience, the best way to learn a new technology is to create something tangible with it. I recently sought out to learn Angular and Angular Material. So, I developed an experimental Angular app that uses omdbapi to query Movie Posters. It’s aptly named Movie Poster Finder.

Developing the Movie Poster Finder application, I ran into a thing called PWA, which is also known as Progressive Web Applications. I thought it was really neat that both Android and mobile Chrome treat them as native applications.

In this post, I will show an example Progressive Web Application in action, explaining what I encountered when turning an experimental Angular web application into a PWA.



A Conversation About Conversations

David Pitt JavaScript, Keyhole Creations, Mobile, Node.js, React, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

We created a platform that supports developing a “conversational” type application through SMS. The user experience between a user and an SMS application can be thought of as a conversation. A user texts a question or topic, and a reply is returned, then another question and reply is performed until a desired result is accomplished.

Now, this is not a universal user experience, but for many use cases it can provide an easy to deliver users functionality quickly and conveniently. There is no need to install or download apps, or pop open a browser and type in a URL; just have a conversation through your texting app.

In this blog: Why conversational applications are handy, examples of conversational applications we have created, and a walkthrough of the application architecture used to develop those SMS applications. Includes how to make texting a richer experience, state, and session handling insights.



Getting Started With Ionic 2

Adam Costenbader JavaScript, Mobile, Technology Snapshot, Tutorial Leave a Comment

Everyone wants to have an “App” to represent them, their company, or just to perform some common task they might have in mind.

The problem with this is that there is so much to mobile app development. iPhone apps require that you have a Mac to compile them. Android apps have to deal with platform fragmentation. iPhone apps can mean working with Objective C, Android can mean Java– and if you aren’t a polyglot and fluent both these languages, you probably feel that mobile app development is quite the daunting task.

Luckily, though, there are other options to choose from – like the Ionic 2 framework. In this blog, we’ll show just how easy it is to get up and running with Ionic 2 by creating a reference mobile application. By the end of this blog, our application will have the ability to run in the browser, emulator, or be built-out to run on a device.



Getting Started Building 3D Simulations In Unity3D, Part 1

Greg Yotz .NET, Mobile, Technology Snapshot, Tutorial 2 Comments

Welcome to part one of a three-part blog series on Unity 3D. In this series, we will create a simple 3D game in Unity3D with rich controls. Part one will cover how to set up Unity3D. Part two will teach you how to control Unity3D using C#. The third and final post in this series will delve into actually making …