Using C#, XAML + Uno Platform to Build One Codebase, Cross-Platform Apps

Rukesh Shrestha C#, Mobile, Problem Solving, Technology Snapshot 1 Comment

For more than a decade, we have been developing applications with C# and XAML. Throughout that time, the pair has really only been known for Desktop (WPF) and UWP applications.

Later came Xamarin, which utilizes C# as a unified language to share between all platforms. Then Xamarin.Forms was introduced, which was different in that it utilized XAML to develop the user interface with a single codebase for cross-platform (iOS, Android, UWP).

This progression has excited all the WPF developers out there. The only remaining platform left was web development. At one time, Silverlight was the option, but it was deprecated because of heavy loading and security concerns of browser plug-in solutions.

Then came the WebAssembly [also known as Web Assembly Modules (WASM)] that web browsers can directly execute without having to parse a source file.

In this post, we will discuss how to create a rich user browser interface using the cross-platform Uno Platform and WebAssembly technology. The example application will walk through building Models, ViewModel and View under a shared project that is common to all different platform-specific projects.

August 8th: Streamlined App Development with Xamarin.Essentials

Keyhole Software Community, Company News, Educational Event, Keyhole, Mobile, Xamarin Leave a Comment

The Keyhole Software team is excited to announce that we are to host and sponsor the upcoming Kansas City Mobile Developers Meetup on Thursday, August 8th. The August meetup of the educational user group will be led by Keyhole’s Mike Cerny with the topic focused on Xamarin.Essentials.

This meetup group discusses…

React Native With Expo

Lou Mauget JavaScript, Mobile, React, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

The React Native framework supports an installable mobile application created from JavaScript source code. It is not a React-based web app wrapper. It isn’t a code generator. There is no required application source code in Java, Objective-C, Swift, or Kotlin. Moreover, a single React Native application targets both iOS and Android devices.

In this blog, we show a quick-start that results in an executing application on a phone, within five minutes. That application is live-reloadable, native cross-platform, and written in JavaScript. It is not a web application.

Tastes Like Burning: An Example of ARKit and iOS Particle Systems

Derek Andre Mobile, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

We have reached a peak in computer science: I can make fire come out of my face. Apple has made it simple with an iPhone X to track a user’s face and use a particle systems file to add special effects.

In this post, I will demonstrate how to “breathe fire” using Xcode 9.4.1, Swift 4.1.2, and iOS 11.4.1 on my iPhone X. For this tutorial, you will need a physical device with a TrueDepth camera. The completed project is available on GitHub.

File -> New -> Project
A lot of iOS tutorials start off with creating a Single View Application. That can get boring. Luckily in this article….

Getting Started with Xamarin.Forms and Azure Mobile App Service

Jeff Hopper .NET, Azure, Mobile, Technology Snapshot, Tutorial, Xamarin 2 Comments

Earlier this month my friend Ryan introduced us to Getting Started with Xamarin Forms and Prism. In that post, Ryan started a mobile application to display blog posts which he called SimpleBlog.

In this article, I would like to continue that demonstration by adding a back-end server to persist and share these blogs. This will be accomplished using Azure’s Mobile App Service which falls within its free tier services.

Yes, you did read that right: you can spin up an Azure account and have access to try out many of Azure’s features. For instance, the example I am going to walk you through today can be hosted indefinitely without costing you anything, and to that, you could add nine more web, mobile, or API services. See https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/free/ for more information.

There is no way I am going to be able to cover all the possibilities available in an Azure Mobile App service, much less what Azure has to offer. My intent in this post is to help “whet your appetite” on the possibilities by giving a quick overview of just two great frameworks that play great together: the Microsoft.Azure.Mobile.Client mobile framework tied to an Azure Mobile Apps Service….