Java-Based UI Frameworks

Rik Scarborough Java, Programming 1 Comment

In today’s development environment, there is an abundance of frameworks that we can choose from for front-end or user interface (UI) work.

I was recently talking with a friend about UI development. He has also been a programmer since programming was considered an arcane art (when those of us that did it were considered like Gandalf the Grey facing the Balrog). Or maybe we just saw ourselves that way. Regardless, both of us have been Java programmers for a great deal of that time.

We both lamented the fact that it was a context switch to go from coding most of our projects in Java, then needing to switch to JavaScript for the front end.

Based on conversations I’ve seen online, several readers are warming up their keyboards to chide me for complaining about having to code in JavaScript. Keep your keys cool, both of us and our co-workers are experienced in, and happy to write in, JavaScript and any of its frameworks for our clients. But using JavaScript isn’t always the best approach.

 In this post, we introduce two frameworks that allow you to code your user interface in Java: GWT & Vaadin…

Gaining Docker Image Size Efficiencies By Separating Application Layers

Luke Patterson Docker, Java, Problem Solving, Spring Boot, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

Problem

I was pushing a new Docker image tag for each application code commit, and the admins of the private registry were getting annoyed at how much space I was using.

Solution Summary

Yes, I know there are strategies to clean up old tags but I first wanted to reduce the impact of the tags I was pushing. With the right layering strategy, I knew I could reduce the net registry size increase of consecutive tag pushes.

I wanted to only push what had actually changed in the application. In addition to reducing the impact on the registry, having smaller tag deltas could possibly speed up rolling deployments since nodes could potentially have less to download.

Using MongoDB and Spring Boot to Create a RESTful Web Service

Robert Rice Java, Spring Boot, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

Spring Boot is a framework designed to simplify the bootstrapping and development of a new Spring application. The framework takes an opinionated approach to configuration, freeing developers from the need to define a boilerplate configuration. MongoDB is a simple set up and easy to use document database. A RESTful API is an application program interface (API) that uses HTTP requests to GET, PUT, POST and DELETE data.

In this post, I will demonstrate the process of creating a RESTful web application with Spring Boot and MongoDB.

Hello Micronaut

Rik Scarborough Java, Microservices, Testing Leave a Comment

From some of my previous posts, you can get the idea that I promote the idea of developing maintainable code rapidly. So I was pretty excited when I learned that the same group that was responsible for Grails was working on a similar project for Web Services. Hello, Micronaut.

In this post, I provide an introduction to the Micronaut framework and its features to provide a foundation for you to try it out yourself.

Java 10 and Local-Variable Type Inference

Robert Rice Java, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

JDK 10, an implementation of Java Standard Edition, was released in March 2018. It brought with it Local-Variable Type Inference to help simplify the writing of Java applications.

Basically, it’s a new syntax meant to reduce some of Java’s verbosity, while still maintaining the enforcement of static type safety. In simpler terms, you are able to declare variables, but won’t necessarily have to specify the type.

In this blog, I give recommendations for best practice when using Local-Variable Type Inference in JDK 10 with an eye for common var pitfalls…