Improve Java Skills By Going Old School

Want to Get Better at Java? Go Old School.

Rik Scarborough Java, Programming Leave a Comment

So you’re a Java programmer, and you want to take your skills to a higher level. I’m going to suggest you take a project and go old school.

Over the course of this blog, I’ll explain what “going old school” means as well as give you some tips and tricks to get started. We’re going to step away from most modern tools and go back to the basics, so you gain a deeper understanding of what Java is and how it works. By the end, you should be well on your way to improving your Java skill set.

GINQ for the win

Using Groovy 4: GINQ for the Win

Rik Scarborough Development Technologies, Groovy, Java, Programming 4 Comments

In my last blog post Back in the Groovy 4, I briefly mentioned Groovy-Integrated Query (GINQ). I’ve been wanting to write about how I would use this new feature, and I decided to take this opportunity to do so.

In this post, I will be describing two examples in which I used GINQ. The first requirement I faced on a recent project of mine and demonstrating how I used GINQ to fulfill it. A quick disclaimer: this is not a tutorial on GINQ. This blog is merely a discussion of how I’ve used GINQ and how I plan on making it part of my toolkit.

Groovy 4

Back in the Groovy 4

Rik Scarborough Development Technologies, Groovy, Java Leave a Comment

When I heard that Groovy 4 is coming out, I decided to get ahead of it. I went online to explore what new features we were getting and how I could start using them in my own code.

This article will not be a full list of the new features of Groovy 4; there are simply too many for one post. This post will simply be my thoughts on a select few of those features and how I would plan to use them.

Let’s get started!

Updating Microservices with Netty 5, Kafka 3, and React: Whirlpool Revisited

John Boardman Development Technologies, Java, JavaScript, Microservices, React Leave a Comment

Back in 2015 and 2016, I wrote two blogs that went step by step to develop a microservice/Netty architecture with fully working code called Whirlpool.

A lot has changed in the years since, so recently I decided to come back to the project, update it with the latest versions of Kafka and Netty, and add a React UI to it (rather than the vanilla JavaScript version it used before). In addition, I also added Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) scripts in addition to the Mac and Linux scripts that were there before and made all of the scripts more robust.

This blog will be about the work that went into all of those updates, plus a look at the new React UI. This provides an excellent view into what it takes to update an outdated microservices application implemented with Kafka (version .9 –>3.0) and Netty (4.1.3->5.0.0-alpha2), bringing all versions up to date and adding a React UI. By the end you’ll be familiar with the latest versions of these frameworks, know some “gotchas” to avoid, as well as understand how to integrate WebSockets into React.

Spring Boot With GraphQL: What The Cool Kids Are Doing

Matt McCandless Development Technologies, GraphQL, Spring Boot 2 Comments

This article is going to introduce you to Spring Boot with GraphQL. We’ll walk through a simple beer app to show you what it can do. So you have built this really sweet API with all the gets, puts, and deletes you can think of. Your baby is just beautiful the way it is, right? Well, maybe developer Joe thinks …