Building a Java Cloud Native Spring Microservice Application on Azure, Part 1

Zach Gardner Azure, Cloud, Java, Microservices, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

The big three cloud providers (AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud, in that order) have their various strengths and areas of expertise. Most large organizations though typically pick one cloud provider for their cloud computing needs. This works well if you’re a Java shop that’s on AWS, or a Microsoft shop on Azure. But what if you’re on a large Java project in an organization that wants to use Azure? You’re in luck.

Microsoft Azure has come a long way, and is very supportive of non-Microsoft technologies. The proof though is in the pudding. Which is where this blog post comes in. I take Josh Long’s Bootiful Microservice Services, a great starting point to get a cloud native Spring microservice application up and running, and show how it can be run on Azure.

This first blog post will be all about setting up our basic microservices by walking through the various parts of Josh’s example application, with some best practices and patterns that I’ve found to be effective. Rather than a simplistic ToDo application, we’ll be basing our application off of my favorite bagel shop in New York, Original Bagel Boss in Hicksville, to manage its orders, inventory, etc. If we can run a bagel shop on a Spring application running on Azure, and keep customers happy and full of carbohydrates, then it proves out for applications of a similar size and complexity.

We’ll be staying mostly inside the familiar Java confines, then slowly start working our way out to getting our application deployed to Azure. Then we’ll start introducing additional complexity like Spring Batch jobs, a React front end, etc. A setup this complex will show that Azure is ready for prime time when it comes to running applications in production, even if they are built on non-Microsoft technologies…

Quick Start: AWS SQS + Spring Boot Processing FIFO Queues

Brandon Klimek AWS, Microservices, Spring Boot, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

AWS SQS (Simple Queue Service) can provide developers with flexibility and scalability when building microservice application(s). In this quick start tutorial, we will demonstrate how to configure a FIFO queue for a fictional online marketplace.

What Is A FIFO Queue?

A FIFO (first in, first out) queue is used when the order of items or events is critical, or where duplicates items in the queue are not permitted. For example:

– Prevent a user from buying an item that isn’t available on a marketplace.

Spring Boot and React: Happily Ever After

Matt McCandless Problem Solving, React, Spring Boot, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

So you have mastered Spring Boot and started toying around with React. Now you want React to talk to your Boot app as your back-end API. That’s fabulous. You probably already know how to do this, but there is a kicker. You want to package them and start both of them as just one project.

Well, you’re in luck! This blog is going to take a couple of simple projects and combine them into one project. Lace up your boots and get ready to React!

Java Development Using Visual Studio Code

Todd Horn Design, Dev Methodologies, Java, Problem Solving, Programming Leave a Comment

Over the last few years, I have worked on several .NET and JavaScript projects. My go-to IDE for Angular, Node, and (in starting to learn) React has been Visual Studio Code, along with Visual Studio Enterprise for C#.

Recently, I started on a new team and project that was in Java. Our initial thought was to switch back over to Spring Tool Suite or IntelliJ. But, there are some really good extensions now for Java in VS Code that made that transition unnecessary. So we decided to take a look at what Visual Studio code could do for us – we were very pleasantly surprised!

In this post, I provide links and information to get you started down the right path for Java in Visual Studio Code.

Gaining Docker Image Size Efficiencies By Separating Application Layers

Luke Patterson Docker, Java, Problem Solving, Spring Boot, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

Problem

I was pushing a new Docker image tag for each application code commit, and the admins of the private registry were getting annoyed at how much space I was using.

Solution Summary

Yes, I know there are strategies to clean up old tags but I first wanted to reduce the impact of the tags I was pushing. With the right layering strategy, I knew I could reduce the net registry size increase of consecutive tag pushes.

I wanted to only push what had actually changed in the application. In addition to reducing the impact on the registry, having smaller tag deltas could possibly speed up rolling deployments since nodes could potentially have less to download.