Keyhole Announces Gold Dev Up 2018 Sponsorship & Speaker

Keyhole Software Community, Company News, Educational Event, GraphQL, Keyhole Leave a Comment

We are pleased to announce that Keyhole Software is a Gold Sponsor of the 2018 St. Louis Developer Conference! This will be the fourth year of Keyhole Sponsoring.

Formerly known as the St. Louis Days of .NET and rebranded as Dev Up during the 2015 conference, the 11th annual edition will bring together regional and national IT experts to share their knowledge for technology.

The Dev Up conference is October 8-10, 2018 at the St. Charles Convention Center in St. Charles, Missouri. Monday, October 8th features all-day hands-on sessions called “Pre-Compilers” which are optional. The main conference takes place on October 9th & 10th and features over 140 technical training sessions geared toward all levels of experience.

AWS AppSync with Lambda Data Sources

Mat Warger AWS, Cloud, Development Technologies, GraphQL, JavaScript, Tutorial Leave a Comment

The power of GraphQL lies in its flexibility. That is especially the case regarding resolvers, where any local or remote data can be used to fulfill a GraphQL query or mutation.

In this post, I’m going to demo a quick example of what this looks like, and a couple gotchas that were apparent in working with Lambdas as a data source for AppSync. Let’s gooooo!

Go Forth and AppSync!

Mat Warger AWS, Development Technologies, GraphQL, JavaScript 1 Comment

In a previous post, we discussed the basics of GraphQL and how it can be a great REST API alternative. In this one, we’ll see how AppSync can be more than just a great API alternative — it gives you a soft landing into the world of GraphQL.

Recall our Game API example? Let’s start with the basic type of a game. Follow along and we can implement a simple schema in AppSync together….

See Keyhole at Nebraska.Code() 2018 – Sponsoring & Speaking

Keyhole Software Community, Company News, Educational Event, GraphQL Leave a Comment

Keyhole Software is excited to once again be a Gold sponsor of the Nebraska.Code() Conference.

The 2018 conference is Wednesday through Friday, June 6th-8th with excellent technical talks on the schedule. Wednesday will consist of half and full-day workshops, while Thursday and Friday will consist of 100+ one-hour breakout sessions. This year, the conference has moved to the Mid-America Center in Council Bluffs, IA, right across the river from Omaha, NE.

Sessions To Watch
Numerous conference sessions will be led by Keyhole Software team members on a myriad of technical topics. Make sure to attend the following Keyhole sessions when setting your own personal conference calendar…

Rethinking REST Practices: An Introduction to GraphQL with AWS AppSync

Mat Warger AWS, Cloud, Development Technologies, GraphQL, JavaScript, Programming Leave a Comment

The basic premise of data transfer and involves requesting and receiving lists. This is simplistic, but it gets to the root of why we’ve developed the technologies and best practices to pass data using web services. RESTful APIs have grown to serve the needs of numerous individuals, startups, and enterprise companies across the world. They are useful, productive, and the concepts surrounding them are relatively standardized. If you don’t know how to create one, you can quickly find information building a great API that can grow to fit your needs. That’s when things get complicated…

If you start digging into REST, you’ll realize there’s quite a bit more to throwing lists. There are common threads that many people encounter when developing an API, and you begin to encounter many of the same questions so many others have before, such as: How strictly should you adhere to the principles of REST? How should you handle versioning? Should you bother? How do you want to structure your objects? Are users able to easily figure out what API endpoints are available and how they should be used?

There are many ways approach these. It boils down to communicating the structures that a given endpoint will return or accept. The cascade of questions that results from the choices made here will ripple through from the back-end to the client. The secondary issue is that these questions and choices are not at all uncommon. There are answers to these that follow Best Practices. But there is still plenty of ambiguity involved when attempting to build a flexible API that works well. These are the Commonly Tolerated Situations.

If you hadn’t already guessed, there is a solution that frees us from the dogma of REST and allows us to solve all these issues in a declarative, powerful, and fun way. That solution is GraphQL. In this blog, I’ll provide an introduction to the GraphQL specification with code examples…