Hello Micronaut

Rik Scarborough Java, Microservices, Testing Leave a Comment

From some of my previous posts, you can get the idea that I promote the idea of developing maintainable code rapidly. So I was pretty excited when I learned that the same group that was responsible for Grails was working on a similar project for Web Services. Hello, Micronaut.

In this post, I provide an introduction to the Micronaut framework and its features to provide a foundation for you to try it out yourself.



Service Discovery with Eureka and Zuul

Jarett Lear .NET, Microservices, Spring, Spring Boot 1 Comment

One issue that we face day to day as developers is speed of development. One of the coolest things to me in the ever-changing landscape of technology is how this issue us continually being addressed in an effort to makes our lives easier.

We have gone from having to write everything needed in a verbose way to being able to configure a simple REST API in a few lines of code with Spring Boot. The most amazing part of this is not only the ability to create the web services but also the ability to allow these services to communicate in a smart way. Spring has given us many tools to allow easy configuration and putting together things that just work (mostly).

This post is not to be considered a full guide to which the extent of these technologies can be leveraged. In this post, we give examples of how Spring Boot can be used (along with Zuul and Eureka) to create a simple discovery service.

There are other components that can be added for things like a configuration server to pull all application.properties files from a common location that is updatable in real time, or circuit breakers to allow the graceful failing of different pieces of your API.

What this post will focus on is the service discovery between Spring Boot applications. We will also touch on how, using SteeltoeOSS, .NET applications can also take advantage of being a part of the service discovery and be routed through our Spring Boot-based Zuul Gateway. We will also look at how we can integrate Spring Security into our gateway to secure the entire API no matter the language…



user story mapping

Every Agile Software Project Needs a User Story Map

Rusty Divine Agile, Microservices Leave a Comment

In this blog, I share an example of a real-world, agile enterprise modernization project that benefited from a User Story Map.

I’m the team lead for a project to convert a business solution from COBOL to a .NET microservices architecture. Other than some interesting challenges with designing a robust microservices solution, the business logic is very straightforward – input files are processed, databases queried, output files are produced and dropped in a folder, and our goal is to match the output produced by the COBOL solution perfectly.

Yet, we lost our way fairly early on in the project because we had a typical prioritized backlog. Unfortunately, even on a straightforward, well-defined project with an engaged team, we still managed to veer off course.

Our project manager started asking questions about where we were in the project and where we were going. I struggled to answer those questions because I couldn’t make sense of all that was in our backlog. It was around this time that I took a spreadsheet and created our first User Story Map….



OpenShift Quick Start: Build, Deployment and Pipeline

David Pitt Microservices, OpenShift, Tutorial Leave a Comment

This post is a continuation of our hands-on OpenShift Quick Start blog series.

In the first post we introduced OpenShift & its features. In part two, you worked to get OpenShift running locally & adding a Container with an API service to a Pod. In part three, you worked on scaling pods and managing Cluster with the CLI.

This blog continues that series, introducing the automated Continuous Integration / Continuous Delivery (CICD) features of the OpenShift platform using both the Web Console and the Command Line. A hands-on exercise will then show how a Jenkins build Pipeline can be customized…



OpenShift Quick Start: CLI

David Pitt Microservices, OpenShift Leave a Comment

This post is a continuation of our hands-on OpenShift Quick Start blog series. In the first post we introduced OpenShift, and in part two, you worked to get OpenShift running locally & adding a Container with an API service to a Pod. Make sure you’ve completed that step prior to starting the continued exercise below!

The previous blogs in this series managed OpenShift using the web admin user interface. However, everything that can be done with the user interface can also be done from using the CLI (Command Line Interface). Arguably, developers prefer to interact with text commands, but that’s a generalization.

In this post, we’ll demonstrate common OpenShift commands can be done in the web admin from the command line.