Keyhole Software Earns AWS Consulting Partner Status

Keyhole Software AWS, Company News, Consulting, Keyhole Leave a Comment

We are proud to announce that Keyhole Software has earned its status as an Amazon Web Service Consulting Partner.

Keyhole Software is now a Standard Tier Consulting Partner in the Amazon Web Services (AWS) Partner Network (APN), joining an elite group of technology partners nationwide. The partner network consists of professional services firms that help customers design, architect, build, migrate and manage their workloads on AWS platforms.

Keyhole earned the APN Standard Consulting Partner designation due to a demonstrated level of expertise with the AWS platform through a combination of customer testimonials, professional certifications, and investments in employee educational programs. Companies that have gained this status have demonstrated deep expertise in delivering customer solutions on AWS…. 

Web Development Business

Refreshing Your Scrum

Keith Shakib Agile, Consulting, Design, Dev Methodologies, Problem Solving, Soft Skills 3 Comments

Most of us now have some experience with Agile Scrum practices. Many of us have had years of practice on multiple processes. As a consultant, I have the opportunity to see many differences in how organizations implement and practice the most popular development process methodologies.

While the prescription for good practices is well-documented, many of us have lost our “mojo” at least once and seen many of the benefits of using the process decline.

In this blog, I will indicate some key points required to return to optimal agile performance. I will highlight three common pitfalls, some common causes of those problems, and reminders of how to get back to a high-performance Scrum implementation. Let’s dive in.

Web Development Business

Performing Technical Interviews For Consulting Clients

Clayton Neff Business, Consulting, Opinion, Soft Skills Leave a Comment

The situation will occasionally arise when we have gained enough respect and confidence from our clients that they will ask us to help them interview new technical people to join the team. As consultants, it’s important for us to be the person that our client needs us to be at the time, so we are definitely willing to help. But, needless to say, this situation must be handled with ‘kid gloves.’

Many managers are uncomfortable performing a technical interview in an area they do not feel competent in. Typically, that is when they will ask for your help in the interview process. As technical consultants, we should be able to provide useful feedback to them about the person’s apparent abilities. When it comes to the ‘soft skills,’ we want to ensure we’re on the same page with the client as to if we should limit the interactions to just the technical topics.

Whether you’re a consultant helping your client, or the client manager looking to fill your employee team, there are a number of topics that must be considered when searching for the right technical person. In this post, I will point out some useful topics to concentrate on while performing a technical interview– and why they are important questions to ask before hiring a new person to the team

Web Development Business

Life as a Software Consultant

John Boardman Business, Consulting, Keyhole, Opinion, Other Leave a Comment

I’ve been in the field of programming professionally since 1990. I started out as a corporate employee for 14 years, then as a consultant, back to an employee, and finally settled with consulting. In both positions, I’ve worked with small, medium, large, and huge Fortune 50 corporations. There are many similarities between being an employee and a consultant, but there are also some significant differences.

In this blog, I’ll explore what life has been like in each role and hopefully give some perspective to others who might just be starting out. Keep in mind when I write “employee,” I am specifically targeting programmers.

Web Development Business

Technical Debt – Observe, React, Prevent

Keith Shakib Consulting, Opinion, Soft Skills Leave a Comment

The term “technical debt” was coined over a decade ago to help highlight a common problem in software development. Generally you can think of technical debt like this:

The cost of additional rework created by choosing an easy, shortcut solution now instead of the better approach that would take longer.

Delivering software to meet deadlines or functional goals that are wrought with technical debt is like buying items before you can afford them. Both practices can drastically affect your ability to reach your future goals, both long term and short term.

This article is a gentle reminder to recognize, fix, and avoid technical debt in your software projects.