Building a Node.js Service with AWS Lambda, DynamoDB, and Serverless Framework

Matthew Brown AWS, Cloud, JavaScript, Node, Tutorial Leave a Comment

My favorite new technology as a developer is serverless computing. The convenience and cost make it a very compelling choice for running options in the cloud. Especially for proof of concepts or quick ways to prove out ideas. Using serverless computing to get up and running takes very little effort and the costs of running an application in the cloud are minimal. Serverless really empowers developers to act on ideas as quickly as possible.

In this post, I’m going to briefly touch on what serverless computing is and the pros and cons of using it. Then I will build a Node.js service to do CRUD operations using AWS Lambda, DynamoDB, and the Serverless Framework. You can view the finished product on Github.

AWS Lambda with Spring Boot

Greg Emerick AWS, Java, Spring, Spring Boot, Technology Snapshot 6 Comments

The typical deployment scenario for a Spring Boot application in AWS involves running the Java application on an EC2 instance 24 hours a day. Of course, the application could be deployed in AWS ECS as a Docker container, but it still runs continuously on an EC2 instance. In each case, the EC2 instances need to be monitored and you pay for compute capacity used by that EC2 instance.

AWS Lambda provides low cost compute with zero maintenance. Lambda runs your code on demand, without provisioned and managed servers. Lambda automatically runs and scales your code. You are charged for every 100ms your code executes and the number of times your code is triggered. If the code isn’t running, you pay nothing.

Lambda has clear cost and maintenance benefits. But what does it take to run the standard Spring Boot application as a Lambda? How does it work? What are the drawbacks? These are the questions that will be answered in this blog through a tangible example…