JavaScript Optional Chaining – An Introduction

Lawrence Chabela CSS & HTML, JavaScript, Problem Solving, Technology Snapshot 1 Comment

There is a new exciting feature coming to JavaScript in the not-so-far future. That feature is Optional Chaining. At this moment, Optional Chaining is in Stage 3 of the TC39 process, so it’s in late stages of the process and will be here soonish.

In general terms, Optional Chaining is an approach to simplify JavaScript expressions for accessing deeply nested values, array items, and methods when there is a possibility that a reference may be missing.

In this blog, we give an introduction to Optional Chaining in JavaScript. We discuss what problems Optional Chaining solves, the various ways you can use it, and relatable code examples.

Progressive Web App Tips and Tricks

John Boardman CSS & HTML, HTML5, Problem Solving Leave a Comment

PWA (Progressive Web App) is a powerful solution to multiple problems. Prior to PWA, there were some browser-specific implementations to some of the problems solved by PWA, but PWA is much more elegant while solving more problems at the same time.

In this post, we’ll cover the problems PWA was created to solve, some of the solutions PWA replaced, tools that make PWA development faster and more flexible, and tips to get the most out of PWA development.

React vs. Angular: A Comparison Between Two Great Options

Robert Rice Angular, JavaScript, Opinion, React, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

Both React and Angular are very popular front end development frameworks. In this post, I will discuss the similarities and differences between the two, and consider when one should be used instead of the other.

React is an open-source JavaScript library introduced by Facebook to build dynamic user interfaces. It is based on JavaScript and JSX (a PHP extension) and is considered widely for developing reusable HTML elements for front-end development.

Angular is an open-source front-end development framework powered by Google. It is a part of the MEAN stack and is compatible with a large number of code editors and is considered for creating dynamic websites and web apps.

In this post, we will begin by going over the benefits of React and Angular, then break down the differences between the two frameworks using thirteen attributes. By comparing each framework side by side, it can help decide which is the best framework for your specific app project.

Elm Language

Lou Mauget JavaScript, Programming, Single-Page Application, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

This blog is about my dalliance with Elm; a purely functional, statically typed language that has type inference. It compiles to JavaScript. Functional programming is compelling, but heretofore, I’d only woven cherry-picked techniques into large object-oriented projects. In FP parlance, I’m partially applied! The times, they are a-changin’.

In this article, I’ll:
– touch on the reasoning for giving a nod to functional languages and data immutability;
– move on to Elm; a blazing-fast, statically typed, purely functional browser-side language that compiles to JavaScript and follows the principles of functional reactive programming;
– survey background items and the Elm environment;
– show a simple type-and-click application, followed by a more realistic To-do application;
– end with my impressions from functional-programming semi-outsider point-of-view.

AWS Lambda With NestJS

Greg Emerick AWS, JavaScript, Node, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

In my previous blog post, I showed running a Spring Boot Java application in AWS Lambda. I discussed the pros and cons of using Java and Spring with Lambda. In this blog post, I’ll cover another Lambda option with NestJS. NestJS provides a framework that is not too different from a typical Spring application. It also addresses some of the negatives of using Java and Spring in a Lambda function.

To recap, AWS Lambda provides low cost compute with zero maintenance. Lambda runs your code on demand, without provisioned and managed servers. Lambda automatically runs and scales your code. You are charged for every 100ms your code executes and the number of times your code is triggered. Lambda has clear cost and maintenance benefits over typical on-premise or EC2 deployments. What does it take to run a Nest application as a Lambda? Does NestJS provide benefits over a Java Spring application?