React vs. Angular: A Comparison Between Two Great Options

Robert Rice Angular, JavaScript, Opinion, React, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

Both React and Angular are very popular front end development frameworks. In this post, I will discuss the similarities and differences between the two, and consider when one should be used instead of the other.

React is an open-source JavaScript library introduced by Facebook to build dynamic user interfaces. It is based on JavaScript and JSX (a PHP extension) and is considered widely for developing reusable HTML elements for front-end development.

Angular is an open-source front-end development framework powered by Google. It is a part of the MEAN stack and is compatible with a large number of code editors and is considered for creating dynamic websites and web apps.

In this post, we will begin by going over the benefits of React and Angular, then break down the differences between the two frameworks using thirteen attributes. By comparing each framework side by side, it can help decide which is the best framework for your specific app project.

Spring Boot and React: Happily Ever After

Matt McCandless Problem Solving, React, Spring Boot, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

So you have mastered Spring Boot and started toying around with React. Now you want React to talk to your Boot app as your back-end API. That’s fabulous. You probably already know how to do this, but there is a kicker. You want to package them and start both of them as just one project.

Well, you’re in luck! This blog is going to take a couple of simple projects and combine them into one project. Lace up your boots and get ready to React!

Machine Learning: The Time is Now!

David Pitt Machine Learning, React, Tutorial Leave a Comment

Machine Learning enables a system to automatically learn and progress from experience without being explicitly programmed. It’s a subset of the artificial intelligence (AI) technology space being applied and used throughout your everyday life. Think Siri, Alexa, toll booth scanners, text transcription of voicemails – these types of tools are used by just about everyone.

Image recognition and computer vision are also widely being used in production; recently just heard that Los Angeles, CA has made it illegal for law enforcement to use face recognition technology in its numerous public video cameras. The current state of the art allows real-time identification.

Interestingly, the algorithms and know-how for Machine Learning have been around for a long time. Artificial Intelligence was coined and researched as far back as the late 1950s, the advent of the digital computer, and expert systems and neural networks, that theoretically mimics how our brain learns.

The increase in Machine Learning production-ready applications started around 2012, with increased processing, bandwidth, and internet throughput power. This is important as deep learning algorithms like Neural Networks require lots of data and FPUs/GPUs to train.

In this blog, we introduce a conceptual overview of Neural Networks with a simple Neural Net code example implementation using Go. We will interact with it by building a ReactJS interface and train the Neural Network to recognize hand-drawn images of the numbers 0-9. Let’s dive in….

AWS Amplify GraphQL Queries with TypeScript and Hooks

Mat Warger AWS, JavaScript, React, Technology Snapshot, Tutorial, TypeScript Leave a Comment

I’m a big fan of Amplify. I’m also a big fan of TypeScript. Amplify is not built with TypeScript, and to use it effectively, sometimes you need to give it a little help, especially when it comes to GraphQL. With the advent of hooks, we can create some nice utilities for ourselves that let us leverage the power of TypeScript with our GraphQL queries. Let’s see what that looks like.

I’ll be assuming familiarity with React and TypeScript, i…

Originally posted by Mat Warger on mw.codes April 19, 2019.

A Look Into React Hooks

Nick Brown JavaScript, React, Single-Page Application 1 Comment

There are two ways to create React components, using functions or classes. A common question when learning React is often “When do I use which?” Luckily, this is a question that might eventually become obsolete with the release of React version 16.8 as it includes hooks.

Hooks provide a way to use functionality such as state and context that could only be achieved through classes previously to be easily done with functional components.

In this blog, we’ll introduce React hooks and show some code examples of those hooks in action. Specifically, we will take a simple class component and convert it to a function with hooks, have an in-depth look at hooks useState and useEffect, and create a custom hook. Let’s get started!