JMeter Performance and Load Testing

Todd Horn Java, Testing, Tutorial Leave a Comment

Apache JMeter is an open source application tool designed to load test functional behavior and measure performance on static pages, dynamic resources, and web applications. It can be used to simulate a heavy load on a server or group of servers, database, or network to test its strength, or to analyze overall performance under different load types.

In this post, I’ll provide an introduction to JMeter with the goal to get you up and running (and testing!), more quickly and easily…



Managing Docker Containers with OpenShift and Kubernetes

Casey Justus Docker, Microservices, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

For the last few years, Docker containers have been all the rage in the DevOps world. After all, what’s not to like? They allow you to strip out 99% of stuff in your VM and just deploy your code.

Containers can save resources, speed deployment, scale well and offer more fault tolerance. But how do you manage them?

In my experience, the Docker Machine and Docker Swarm stack hasn’t lived up my to expectations. It has a limited API, no support for monitoring and logging, and much more manual scaling. AWS’s EC2 containers scale well, but you’ll be locked into Amazon.

In my opinion, the best current stack for Docker containers includes Kubernetes and OpenShift. In this blog I will give a brief introduction to Kubernetes + OpenShift with an eye for what they do well…



Encrypting Working Files Locally in Spring Batch

Rik Scarborough Java, Spring, Spring Batch, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

It seems that quite often we read stories in the news about computer systems being cracked and data being compromised. It’s a growing concern that should be a consideration for everyone in Information Technology. There is probably not just one solution that will keep all data safe, but hopefully small efforts in many areas will provide us with the best possible solution.

In this post, I show a solution for encrypting sensitive files for local use with Java’s Encryption library & tying directly into Spring Batch readers and writers.

The Scenario
Recently we began writing a Spring Batch application that would handle sensitive data. The application servers were set up with some very good, basic security, but we felt the data could use some extra protection.

The data would be delivered to the company on a well-protected and secure FTP server. Mark Fricke did an excellent post recently on Spring Integration and Spring Batch in which he discusses downloading an encrypted file from a FTP server and decrypting it. Unfortunately, this was not exactly the problem we had. We needed to download a unencrypted file, but never write it to the Application Server unencrypted. But, we needed to be able to read that file and process it in Spring Batch.

Using Java’s built-in cryptography, we are able to extend Spring Batch to encrypt the file on the disk and then read that file in a Spring Batch Reader. In addition, we can write the results out as an encrypted file then transfer that file back to the secure FTP server as clean text.

Wow, that sounds like a lot and will be a really complex solution. Actually the code turned out to not be all that complex. This solution relies partly on the Delegate Pattern I wrote about before, so I will be using the same code I developed for that and just showing the changes here. Please refer back to the original post…



Explosive Tutorial With Unity3D and VRTK

Robert Rice .NET, Technology Snapshot, Tutorial Leave a Comment

Opinions on the emerging Virtual Reality market vary. One one end, there are those who say it’s just a gimmick and will pass shortly. On the other end, there are those who herald it as the birth pangs of a paradigm shift in how we interact with technology.

I sit somewhere in the middle. I own an HTC Vive and it is pretty dang awesome. The experience is not perfect, of course, but with interest growing and prices coming down, it’s just going to get better.

One expression of VR’s growing popularity is that Unity3D supports VR programming. And, with the free VRTK (Virtual Reality Tool Kit) framework, it’s becoming much easier to get started programming for VR. VRTK implements many basic components, such as various movement implementations, object interaction, and projectiles.

Working on a fun little side project, I noticed one implementation it did not have: a virtual reality bomb. So, I set upon to create one myself. This post details the process I went through for creating a timed, throwable, explosive object for virtual reality using Unity3D & VRTK.