Using CSS Grid to Prevent Page Jank

Lawrence Chabela CSS & HTML, Design, JavaScript, Programming, Tutorial Leave a Comment

Layout shifts, or page jank as I like to call it, rears its ugly head when a visible element changes position or dimensions, causing the position or dimensions of content around it to be changed.

There are too many possible reasons behind a layout shift to cover in one post, so I’ve narrowed it down to one in particular for the sake of brevity. In this article, we will discuss this scenario: a component changing its height due to its state being changed from user interaction.

I know that this is a relatively isolated example, especially in the grand scheme of things. However, I think this proves an important point. Solving a layout shift doesn’t always have to be a tedious and complicated process to fix. Sometimes, scenarios like this can easily be solved using the CSS we already have at our disposal.

CSS Grid + CSS Math Expressions = Look Ma No Media Queries

Lawrence Chabela CSS & HTML, Design, Development Technologies, JavaScript Leave a Comment

CSS Grid has been the new, cool kid on the block for a few years now. Grid, with its layout algorithm, has given us so many more capabilities in how we can layout and arrange content in our applications.

CSS Grid allows us to define layout patterns in concise and refined ways. That being said, we simply cannot look at CSS Grid by itself without knowing how other key features of modern CSS (like Math expressions) work with CSS Grid. This can allow us to push the boundaries and create more efficient layouts.

These new layout superpowers enable us to start to move past the constraints and limitations that media queries have.

A Reactrospective: A React Retrospective

James Bradley Angular, Development Technologies, HTML5, JavaScript, React Leave a Comment

Most, if not all, of my experience has been with .NET and .NET Core. I’ve also worked with most of the front-ends throughout history including Classic ASP, Code Behind, Model View Presenter, MVC, Backbone, and, over the last few years, Angular 1… Angular 6… not Angular 2…AngularJS. To me, AngularJS is that old t-shirt that you put on to sleep in; comfortable.

At first, most of us on the team were a bit apprehensive about moving to React. AngularJS was very familiar and Angular 2 seemed like the natural next step. I could learn TypeScript, and as primarily C#-based developer, I really liked the idea of a little typing. I like shiny new things, and I’m always game to learn, so challenge accepted. Since then I’ve had a hand in writing three applications in React and have learned more than a few lessons. These are their stories… dun dun.

JavaScript Optional Chaining – An Introduction

Lawrence Chabela CSS & HTML, Development Technologies, JavaScript 1 Comment

There is a new exciting feature coming to JavaScript in the not-so-far future. That feature is Optional Chaining. At this moment, Optional Chaining is in Stage 3 of the TC39 process, so it’s in late stages of the process and will be here soonish.

In general terms, Optional Chaining is an approach to simplify JavaScript expressions for accessing deeply nested values, array items, and methods when there is a possibility that a reference may be missing.

In this blog, we give an introduction to Optional Chaining in JavaScript. We discuss what problems Optional Chaining solves, the various ways you can use it, and relatable code examples.

Progressive Web App Tips and Tricks

John Boardman CSS & HTML, HTML5 4 Comments

PWA (Progressive Web App) is a powerful solution to multiple problems. Prior to PWA, there were some browser-specific implementations to some of the problems solved by PWA, but PWA is much more elegant while solving more problems at the same time.

In this post, we’ll cover the problems PWA was created to solve, some of the solutions PWA replaced, tools that make PWA development faster and more flexible, and tips to get the most out of PWA development.