[Video] Where Blockchain Fits Into Enterprise Development

Keyhole Software Blockchain, Educational Event, Hyperledger, Keyhole, Video Leave a Comment

This 60-minute video features Keyhole Principle Consultant David Pitt in December 2019 at the Hyperledger KC User Group sponsored by Keyhole Software. Copyright Keyhole Software, 2019.

Hyperledger Fabric is a general-purpose blockchain framework that allows groups and consortiums to share data securely and with providence. Hyperledger Fabric has Java, Go, and Node.js SDKs that allow client applications to interact with an HLF network.

While you don’t need to be a hardcore programmer, understanding basic programming concepts will be helpful in understanding the subject matter.

In this video, Keyhole Software Principal Consultant David Pitt discusses where he feels blockchain fits into modern business applications and how they can be architected. He introduces Hyperledger Fabric, a permissioned blockchain framework, and shows how it can be used to benefit enterprise due to its tamper-proof and distributed nature. In this presentation, David also introduces an open-source reference blockchain with a real use case applicable to global data.

Microservices Anti-Patterns

Dallas Monson Agile, Consulting, Microservices 1 Comment

Microservices? Yeah, you’re doing it wrong.

Microservices is a silver bullet, magic pill, instant fix, and can’t-go-wrong solution to all of software’s problems. In fact, as soon you implement even the basics of microservices all of your dreams come true; you will triple productivity, reach your ideal weight, land your dream job, win the lottery 10 times, and be able to fly, clearly.

While this sounds like a lot of hyperbole wrapped up in some BS, if you have been listening to anything around microservices recently you will most likely have heard something not too far from this exaggerated sentiment – especially if it is coming from sales folks.

As a result of this, you or someone you know will likely have been charged by management to implement a solution in microservices or refactor an existing application to take advantage of microservices to ensure that you get all the magic. With so much overinflation of the truth out there, chances are you may have also implemented a microservices antipattern. These antipatterns are actually more common in the wild than fully functional microservices architectures.

Overview
In this post we will cover the most common antipatterns that I have witnessed in the wild:

Break the Piggy Bank
Everything Micro (Except for the Data)
We are Agile! a.k.a. The Frankenstein

Each one of these results from a common misconception. We will do our best to define these patterns and their symptoms. After each, we will also show a way out of the mess so that you can recover and begin to move towards a better implementation. Let’s get started!