Web Development Business

Pseudo-Static Row Mappers, a Healthy Alternative to Static Row Mapping

Ryan McCullough Java, Spring Leave a Comment

If you know Spring, chances are pretty good that you’ve also worked with RowMappers and everyone’s #1 favorite BeanPropertyRowMapper. Okay, maybe not EVERYONE. But EVERYONE will acknowledge BPRM’s power potential and how wonderfully easy it is to use!

While BeanPropertyRowMapper may be the smartest and most beautiful on the RowMapper block, many in the industry refuse to give it the time of day, and for perfectly justified reasons.

Sometimes, when we can’t have beauty and wisdom, we’re forced to settle for loud and predictable. Yes, I’m talking about hardcoded, unchanging, tell-it-like-it-is, static RowMapper. Hate on them all you like, Static RowMappers are fast, easy to understand, and they seem to replicate like tribbles.

But, as many of you know, an application can grow into a swamp of one-off RowMappers. ESPECIALLY if you are working with a lot of high-throughput batch operations that need to run strictly optimized queries for performance as to avoid any unnecessary marshaling of data.

Recently, I’ve tried a mildly clever alternative to RowMapping I like to call Pseudo-Static Row Mappers. In this post, I introduce the basics of Pseudo-Static Row Mappers. We show how they give the tough rigid optimization and control of hard-coded naming and data typing while retaining BeanPropertyRowMapper’s spirit of freedom.

Fluent Assertions with AssertJ

Billy Korando Effective Automated Testing With Spring Series, Java, Series Leave a Comment

I recently gave a presentation to my Keyhole team members about JUnit 5. I started off the presentation by covering the importance of automated testing, how lack of automated testing affects an organization’s ability to deliver code to production, and how without automated testing you are building legacy.

I pointed out two key benefits of automated testing: confidence you are fixing what you set out to fix, and confidence you are not introducing a new bug. A co-worker however pointed out an important third benefit of automated testing: providing living documentation.

My co-worker made the very good point that automated testing can do more than just checking for code correctness. It can also provide valuable documentation for current and future developers on a project.

In this article, we look at how using AssertJ can make automated tests easier to read and write. We take a look at how AssertJ improves the readability of assertions in test cases, as well as how it helps make the task of comparing complex objects and performing list validations easier to read and write. The goal is that when tests are easier to read and write, it will hopefully encourage developers to write more tests (i.e. documentation).

What’s New in JUnit 5.1

Billy Korando Effective Automated Testing With Spring Series, Java, Series, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

It is hard to believe that JUnit 5 has been out for five months! Already we have our first feature release. There are quite a few changes in 5.1 and you can see them all in the release notes. In this article, we focus on a few of the changes that I think are the most impactful to the day-to-day tasks of writing automated tests…

Conditionally Disabling and Filtering Tests in JUnit 5

Billy Korando Effective Automated Testing With Spring Series, Java, Technology Snapshot, Testing 2 Comments

I’m in the middle of several talks on JUnit 5, so it’s safe to say that JUnit has been on my mind lately. In the last article in this series, we covered how to use test interfaces to encourage good behavior.

In this article, we look at the improvements the JUnit team has made to filtering and conditionally disabling tests in JUnit 5….

Encouraging Good Behavior with JUnit 5 Test Interfaces

Billy Korando Effective Automated Testing With Spring Series, Java, Spring, Technology Snapshot, Testing 2 Comments

JUnit 5, released in September of 2017, is the first major release for the popular JUnit testing framework in a little over a decade. I recently presented on JUnit 5 at Lava One Conf in Hawaii in January. If you have heard about JUnit 5, but are not yet familiar with it, you can check out my presentation here, as well as the JUnit 5 User Guides.

While researching for my presentation, one new feature in JUnit 5 really caught my eye was the ability to declare tests on default methods in interfaces. This feature caught my eye because two issues I frequently face are encouraging developers to write automated tests and promoting consistent patterns across the enterprise. In this article we are going to look at how test interfaces can help accomplish both of these goals.