Keyhole Labs Releases Trouble Maker v2.0.0

Lauren Fournier Company News, Keyhole Creations Leave a Comment

The Keyhole Labs team has announced the release of Trouble Maker v2.0.0.

Trouble Maker is a platform-agnostic tool that randomly takes down services to test stability. It also provides an ad hoc console to produce common troublesome issues in your platform so you can test durability on-demand.

Trouble Maker v2.0.0 introduces specific performance improvements implemented with Spring Boot and Java Websockets. Additionally, the Trouble Maker dashboard user interface has been re-designed, built from the ground up using Angular 2…



Keyhole Labs Releases Spring Boot Starter For Trouble Maker

Lauren Fournier Company News, Java, Spring, Trouble Maker Leave a Comment

The Keyhole Labs team is excited to announce the release of a Spring Boot starter for auto-configuration of Trouble Maker.

This new auto-configuration allows Spring Boot applications to easily enable Trouble Maker. Trouble Maker randomly takes down services during normal business hours in an effort to test stability and automated recovery. It also provides an ad hoc console to test application durability on demand.

See more on the Keyhole Labs blog.



Keyhole Releases Open Source Trouble Maker

Lauren Fournier Company News, Keyhole Creations Leave a Comment

The Keyhole Software team is excited to announce the release of a new open source tool: Trouble Maker. Trouble Maker helps organizations to maintain stable and durable platforms when implementing Microservices platforms and Java web applications. Trouble Maker randomly takes down services during normal business hours in an effort to test stability and automated recovery. In addition, it provides an ad hoc console to produce …



Trouble Maker

Failure As A Use Case: Introducing Trouble Maker

David Pitt Keyhole Creations, Microservices, Programming, Technology Snapshot, Testing Leave a Comment

For too many reasons to count, it is nearly a guarantee that your production software systems will fail in some way. We attempt to QA our software, which essentially tests application “business” function, but it’s very difficult to test what can go wrong in an actual production environment. Things like memory utilization and leaks, port exhaustion, connection pool timeouts, too …