About the Author
James Bradley

James Bradley

James is a skilled software engineer and Keyhole Consultant with 10+ years experience on all levels of the project life cycle. With a diverse technical background, James’ expertise lies in working with .NET and SQL Server solutions that solve complex business problems. Recent projects have included Web API, JavaScript, Node.js, and Backbone.js.

A Reactrospective: A React Retrospective

James Bradley Angular, Development Technology, HTML5, JavaScript, React Leave a Comment

Most, if not all, of my experience has been with .NET and .NET Core. I’ve also worked with most of the front-ends throughout history including Classic ASP, Code Behind, Model View Presenter, MVC, Backbone, and, over the last few years, Angular 1… Angular 6… not Angular 2…AngularJS. To me, AngularJS is that old t-shirt that you put on to sleep in; comfortable.

At first, most of us on the team were a bit apprehensive about moving to React. AngularJS was very familiar and Angular 2 seemed like the natural next step. I could learn TypeScript, and as primarily C#-based developer, I really liked the idea of a little typing. I like shiny new things, and I’m always game to learn, so challenge accepted. Since then I’ve had a hand in writing three applications in React and have learned more than a few lessons. These are their stories… dun dun.

Into the Core

James Bradley .NET, .NET Core, ASP.NET, Development Technology, Tutorial Leave a Comment

The client I’m currently assisting has begun to move applications from more monolithic architecture into a more modern, cloud-based architecture. The organization is a bit of a .NET anomaly in that it is a company that’s primarily Java, yet has some .NET.

So even though Microsoft has a list of framework tools (such as Azure Service Fabric and Azure App Service), it’s fair to say that asking a primarily Java-focused company to use those tools could be an uphill battle. This is where .NET Standard and .NET Core have come to the rescue.

I work with a ton of smart people and I’m pretty amazed at how fast they can pick up on things from reading. I, however, cannot really understand it fully until I touch it. So let’s build a quick RESTful Web API step by step to see how challenging it is. We’ll be using .NET Standard, .NET Core, and ASP.NET Core.

Golden Service Fabric Hammer

James Bradley .NET, Azure, Development Technology, Microservices, Service Fabric, Tutorial Leave a Comment

Attention: The following article was published over 4 years ago, and the information provided may be aged or outdated. Please keep that in mind as you read the post.I had some time before my next project started up, so David Pitt asked me to research and write a blog on Service Fabric. It sounded terrifying. First off, I’m not really what you …