Using Docker + AWS to build, deploy and scale your application

Brandon Klimek AWS, Docker, Spring, Tutorial Leave a Comment

I recently worked to develop a software platform that relied on Spring Boot and Docker to prop up an API. Being the only developer on the project, I needed to find a way to quickly and efficiently deploy new releases. However, I found many solutions overwhelming to set up.

That was until I discovered AWS has tools that allow any developer to quickly build and deploy their application.

In this 30 minute tutorial, you will discover how to utilize the following technologies:
– AWS CodeCommit – source control (git)
– AWS Code Build – source code compiler, rest runner
– AWS Codepipeline – builds, tests, and deploys code every time the repo changes
-AWS Elastic Beanstalk – service to manage EC2 instances handling deployments, provisioning, load balancing, and health monitoring
-Docker + Spring Boot – Our containerized Spring Boot application for the demo

Once finished, you will have a Docker application running that automatically builds your software on commit, and deploys it to the Elastic beanstalk sitting behind a load balancer for scalability. This continuous integration pipeline will allow you to worry less about your deployments and get back to focusing on feature development within your application.



Containers For .NET Developers

Chase Aucoin .NET, Docker, Microservices, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

This is going to be the first post in a series of articles about modern tooling and techniques for building distributed systems. In this post, I will show how to use Docker for Windows to set up an ELK (Elasticsearch, Kibana, Logstash) server that we are going to use in future articles. The series is particularly geared toward traditional .NET developers. Let’s get started…



White Paper Published – Microservices: Patterns for Enterprise Agility and Scalability

Keyhole Software Architecture, Company News, Microservices, Tutorial 4 Comments

We’re excited to announce the release of a new, free white paper on the Microservices software architecture style.

Microservices is an architectural pattern gaining steam in the development community. A Microservices architecture addresses problems that modern enterprises often face, including responding to market demands, handling spikes in traffic, and being tolerant to failure. These benefits are achieved by functionally decomposing a business’ domain into microservices, services that handle only a single responsibility.

In this white paper, we discuss how Microservices came to be, contrasting architecture patterns, features of a Microservices architecture, established patterns, how to get started with Microservices, and suggestions for Microservices adoption.

Download the free Keyhole Software white paper today!



Cobol to Java

Adventures In Modernization: Strategy + Example Converting COBOL To Java

Dallas Monson Consulting, Java, Keyhole Creations, Programming, Technology Snapshot, Tutorial Leave a Comment

We have consultants who specialize in moving old to new, renovating dilapidated code bases, and designing brighter futures for enterprises who have been vendor-locked for most of their existence. We have come across some repeated patterns and strategies for how to approach modernization of legacy systems. In this blog, we will cover a strategy that is very popular right now, Re-Platforming.

The basic flow of this post will be:

Introduction to Modernization
High-level definition of the Re-Platforming Strategy for Modernization
Sample of Re-Platforming using Keyhole Syntax Tree Transformer, COBOL –> Java
Additional thoughts on the value/risk of this strategy

Let’s get started…



Getting Started With JHipster, Part 2

Matt McCandless AngularJS, Java, JavaScript, Microservices, Technology Snapshot Leave a Comment

In part two of this series, we create a microservice architecture using JHipster’s available options for doing so. There is quite a bit more work to do with this approach as compared with the monolithic approach. But, in the end, it pays off. You will see the benefits and flexibility in decoupling our different layers of our architecture. Each layer will not be dependent upon another to run. Let’s get started…